Sunday, April 09, 2006

While watching the Hardy Boys on Thursday night (er, I mean Supernatural) I was tickled to see that this week's episode was set in Fitchburg, Wisonson, which is an immediate suburb of Madison. While the real Fitchburg is not as rainy as the Western Canada where the show is filmed, they did name the hospital correctly -- Dane county is the correct county. I ride my bike through Fitchburg quite a bit but haven't seen any Strega. Its a decent show, though not as smart as the X-files, but the imagery is excellent so if you take it for a spooky hour of tv its just as fun and much cheaper than a splatter flick at the movies. I will give them credit for mentioning the names of other towns in Wisconsin where the Strega had been in the past century -- Ogdenville, North Haverbrook, and Brockway. It took me a minute to get the reference, but it came and that will enough to get me to tune in next week. Its typically a flashy, action based show so it is nice to see geeky references make their way to the surface.

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When does a comic book character's death mean a lot? When its permanent and happens to a major character(Barry Allen, Supergirl)? or when it happens to a minor character that is beloved, sometimes even more so in death (Blue Beetle, Golden Age Sandman, Hawk)? Not to spoil this past week's Infinite Crisis, but where does its death fall into the scheme of things? I would have to say in the middle. I didn't love the character too much but the character's death was heroic and important. This is far too vague. Help me out, Wayne.

1 comment:

Wayne Allen Sallee said...

Regarding the first part of your post, Chris. You need to find out why there is a giant nativity scene on the bluffs near Lynxville. They were there in 1984, but when it comes to the town populace and their knowledge (the statues went up in the 40s), Lynxville makes Ed GeinTown look like, well, Naperville. Okay...
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Second verse, not the same as the verse. Let's call the dead person The Con. I look at this the same way as I did back at Chaos, 1992, Ground Zero. Death of Superman. He's a Kryptonian. How do we know what death is to them. In the same vein, Mr. Con has somewhat similar, unique qualities. I think the death was graphic and used as shock value by DC, and there have been so many rebirths in the 90s, I've not truly believed a single death scene except Sue Dibny's. OK, Ted Kord is dead, too. I'll buy that; he died in as noble a way as Barry Allen. You need to go back an add The Red Bee to your "oldies."